Organix Australian Tea Tree Shampoo

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Okay, so I have been searching for natural dandruff shampoo that actually works. This search has been going on for years, and I’ve tried LOTS of shampoos. I didn’t post about the ones that didn’t work well because they may work for some people, just not me. Today, though, is a momentous day because I can finally post about the dandruff shampoo and conditioner that work really well for me.

Organix is an awesome company that makes cruelty-free hair care (and some body care) products derived from natural, organic ingredients. I have posted about its Coconut Anti-Breakage Serum, which is an amazing product if you have frizzy, damaged hair. Its other amazing products are its Australian Tea Tree shampoo and conditioner, the discovery of which has made my life richer. more meaningful, and virtually flake free. 🙂 The active ingredients are tea tree oil and neem oil, both of which sooth your scalp.

I’ll stop right here because I know what you’re thinking: “Tea tree oil does not work on my dandruff. I might as well be slathering my head with anchovies.” I know! I thought the same thing. I tried so many shampoos with tea tree oil that did absolutely nothing. BUT this stuff works well (I’m on my third bottle). Maybe it’s the combination of tea tree oil and neem oil. The other big difference is this is the only time I’ve used a dandruff fighting conditioner in addition to the shampoo–making it a sort of double whammy. I follow the directions and put the conditioner on my scalp (which, as someone with super oily hair, I learned never to do or else risk having limp, flat hair all day), and it makes my scalp cool and happy. And it doesn’t weigh my hair down. This shampoo and conditioner combo really is great. It works well, smells wonderful (quite a feat for natural dandruff shampoo), and leaves my hair shiny and soft. I use it every day, and it’s only when I skip a day that I notice itchiness, flakes, etc.

You can find Organix products at most grocery stores, big box stores (like Target), and drugstores (like Walgreens and CVS). Both Ulta and Walgreens seem to have the best selection of Organix products. And if you’re a commitmentphobe, you can order trial sizes of Organix’s popular products directly from their website.

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Cosmetic Testing Fact Sheet From the HSUS

I’m back to posting after a long and complicated move from NC to MD. And now on with the show!

Have you ever wondered what exactly qualifies as animal testing? Or whether companies are required by law to test their products on animals? If you have, check out this informative fact sheet from The Humane Society of the United States. It covers the basics of animal tests for cosmetics. From the fact sheet, here’s the definition of “a cosmetic”:

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defines cosmetics as “articles intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body’s structure or functions.”

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